book review, family, Memoir, mental illness, Nonfiction Review, psychology, self-help

Codependent No More

codependent

I will never stop reading this book. Codependent No More reminds me to nurture the person I am and not feel guilty about that. To take care of myself. To remember I cannot control others no matter how much I may think I know what’s best for them.

I know. It’s ridiculous. I sound like I’m nuts. But sometimes my family makes me nuts.  Codependent No More – How to Stop Controlling Others And Start Caring For Yourself was originally written from the prospective of a former alcoholic married to an alcoholic.  Melody Beattie is very frank about her background and knows where of she speaks.

However, this book for any one who is in a relationship that seems out of control. Is your teen acting out or your adult child abusing drugs? Are you are overeating, overexercising, overspending while you seethe and obsess about ways to solve the problem or what advice you want to give?   Is your spouse taking advantage of your good nature and you are doing all you can to keep the peace while inside you feel resentful and used?

It’s natural for us to want to help. The problem is sometimes things have to run their course. Sometimes we really Can. Not. Help. Still we feel compelled to try. And nothing happens. Or the person we tried to help doesn’t appreciate us. Or they don’t want our help. We feel frustrated. Angry. Hurt. Victimized.

Being codependent isn’t always about alcoholics, drug users, or someone living an extreme lifestyle, though it can be, and if that is your life then this book is for you.  But it is also about people-pleasers like me, who care too much when it is actually ourselves for whom we should be caring.

Read Melody’s book. She will make you feel good about yourself, help you embrace the strong wonderful person you are, and in the long run, help you develop healthy relationships with all your loved ones.

4-daisy-rating

Reviewed by Leigh

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Melody Beattie

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book review, happiness, journal, Nonfiction Review, self-help

Gift from the Sea

Gift_from_the_sea_by_anne_morrow_li

Gift from the Sea

 

Anne Morrow Lindbergh
Pantheon Books, 1997, 1955

 

From the back of the book, “A modern-day classic here are Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s elegant and wise meditations on youth and age, love and marriage, solitude, peace, and contentment, as she set the down during a brief vacation by the ocean. She helps us see ways to reconcile our most deeply personal needs with obligations to family, friends, lovers, and work, ways to separate loneliness from replenishing solitude, and ways to find solace in the simplest of daily tasks. Now more than ever, Gift from the Sea serves as a spiritual compass guiding us toward inner tranquility in the face of life’s deeper questions.”

 

I loved this book. It is going on my wish list to add to my library. There is so much nourishment contained within its pages that it deserves – no, demands – to be read once a year. This one reading only scratched the surface if the treasure within. I read it slowly – had to renew it once at the library – as to savor the words and lessons. And there are lessons to be learned and applied to my life. Lessons that are just as meaningful today as the time in which they were originally written.  First published in 1955, her insight into the world and its foibles is just as apropos today as it was then. This quote is timely despite its age:

 

The inter-relatedness of the world links us constantly with more people than our hearts can hold.  Or rather—for I believe the heart is infinite—modern communications loads us with more problems than the human frame can carry. It is good, I think, for our hearts, our minds, our imaginations to be stretched; but body, nerve, endurance and life-span are not as elastic. My life cannot implement in action the demands of all the people to whom my heart responds. I cannot marry all of them, or bear them all as children, or care for them all as I would my parents in illness or old age. Our grandmothers, and even—with some scrambling—our mothers, lived in a circle small enough to let them implement in action most of the impulses of their hearts and minds. We were brought up in a tradition that has now become impossible, for we have extended our circle throughout space and time.

 

I love the way the author  writes – it is quiet, lyrical, and soothing. Like a cup of cool water on a hot day or a mug of hot chocolate on a cold night.

 

“The sea does no reward those who are too anxious, too greedy, or too impatient. To dig for treasures shows not only impatience and greed, but lack of faith. Patience, patience, patience is what the sea teaches. Patience and faith. One should lie empty, open choiceless as a beach—waiting for a gift from the sea.”

 

Rating: 5 daisies

 

Reviewer: Debby 2Debby

 

220px-CharlesLindbergh22Of interest: Anne Morrow Lindbergh was the wife of Charles Lindbergh, of flying solo across the Atlantic fame and mother of  the infamous kidnapping and subsequent murder of her son, Charles Lindbergh, Jr.
book review, happiness, Nonfiction Review, Picture Book, self-help

Everything I Need to Know I Learned From a Little Golden Book

everythingEverything I Need to Know I Learned From a Little Golden Book
Golden Books, Random House, 2013
          From the forward by the author: “Dear Reader, If you are like most Americans, you grew up with Little Golden Books. … We at Golden Books think there’s a good chance that many of us learned pretty much everything that really matters about life from what we read between those sturdy, gilt-bound cardboard covers. … Our country has faced some hard times of late, and we’ve been forced to look at ourselves and how we’re living our lives. …Maybe this book can help you! After all, Little Golden Books were first published during the dark days of World War II, and they’ve been comforting people during trying times ever since – while gently teaching us a thing or two.”
          What a sweet book!  It is compilation of many illustrations from many different Little Golden Books and recaptioned to gently remind the reader to enjoy life. I loved it – but then I love those little books. Many of the illustrations were familiar to me and it was good to see favorite artists again (Eloise Wilkin, Gustaf Tenggren). But I also ran across some books that were new to me, ones that I’d like to read even all these years later!  It’s a great book to give a friend  – or even yourself – when they’re feeling like life has run them over. We love this book very much and although the copy we read is a library book, we wouldn’t mind having a copy for ourselves!!
Rating: 4 daisy rating 4 daisies!
Reviewer: Debby 2 Debby
book review, happiness, Neil Pasricha, Nonfiction Review, self-help

The Happiness Equation

happiness

Just this morning I sat down on my porch swing and the seat broke. I spilled coffee on my white T-shirt. I moved houseplants outside for some fresh air and dropped one on the kitchen floor. A couple of weeks ago I would have been pissed. Today, I took it in stride. I credit my sense of peace to The Happiness Equation – Want Nothing + Do Anything= Have Everything.

Neil Pasricha’s book reads like a devotional of sorts. Thoughtful quotes and stories by everyone from Lao Tzu to Daniel Goleman, bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence; from Rudyard Kipling to Buddha. It’s the kind of book you could read a portion of each day, and if you applied its principles find yourself like I did, less stressed out and more content despite daily mishaps. The author writes that no matter what we acquire in life we usually find ourselves looking ahead to the next new car, new job or new romance. This in itself is nothing new. However, in The Happiness Equation, Pasricha suggests happiness has a formula we can follow to achieve that state, and to do otherwise will keep us forever chasing our tails, like my cat Jax in one of his crazy fits.

The book is easy to read with well-documented research on the study of happiness. The author, who is a graduate of Harvard and well-repected in the business world, began his personal quest for happiness on his blog 1000 Awesome Things. Today Neil Pasricha is considered to be a successful life coach to many like  Walmart, the Audi Executive Team for Audi of America and leaders worldwide. He continues to encourage others not only in this book, but his first, The Book of Awesome and is considered to be a popular speaker on TED talks. In The Happiness Equation  Pasricha presents the possibility of simply being happy, in spite of broken swings, coffee stained T-shirts, and dirt on the kitchen floor.

3 daises

Reviewer: Leigh

leigh 2

neil

 Neil Pasricha
www. Globalhappiness.org